Wrongful Termination
Minnesota Employment Law

Wrongful termination is a catch-all term for any terminating any employee in violation of the law.  Wrongful termination may include discrimination, breach of contract, retaliation including whistleblower, or numerous other protections.

Discrimination may entail an employer terminating an employee based on race, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, disability, and genetic information among others.  Retaliation, another basis for wrongful termination, is when an employer retaliates against an employee for exercising a legal right such as making a discrimination claim, reporting violations of the law, taking FMLA leave, or other employee rights.  An employer breaching your employment contract may also be a basis for wrongful termination.  For example, if an employer terminates an employee without following the procedure laid out in the contract or for a reason specified in the employment contract.

Non-Compete Agreement Contract

Discrimination may entail an employer terminating an employee based on race, sex, pregnancy, national origin, age, disability, and genetic information among others.  Retaliation, another basis for wrongful termination, is when an employer retaliates against an employee for exercising a legal right such as making a discrimination claim, reporting violations of the law, taking FMLA leave, or other employee rights.  An employer breaching your employment contract may also be a basis for wrongful termination.  For example, if an employer terminates an employee without following the procedure laid out in the contract or for a reason specified in the employment contract.

If you feel that you have been wrongfully terminated, it is important to keep all the paperwork, letters, and emails in your possession.  It is also important to seek out an employment attorney as soon as possible in order to advise you on your legal rights.  A wrongful termination is handled differently based on the underlying reason.  Discrimination, for example, is handled differently from breach of an employment contract or a whistleblower claim.  This is why it is important to seek legal advice as soon as possible.

1Bennett v. Storz Broadcasting Co., 134 N. W.2d 892 (Minn. 1965).

2Bess v. Bothman, 257 N.W.2d 791 (Minn. 1977).